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Change Sudo Password Timeout

I always log in as a normal user and use sudo when needing to do administrative tasks. When you first use command with sudo, you have to insert your user’s password, at the first sudo usage. The default pasword timeout

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The Linux and Unix Nobody User

In Linux and Unix, the processes and services run under different users. The processes may have a user created specifically for them, and, if they do not, they will run under a user called nobody. E.g. sshd is the user

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How to give root access to a group for a few commands only

Sometimes you need to allow a group of users to use a few root commands or exec scripts with root priviledges. In Linux, to give limited root access to a group, you need to edit the /etc/sudoers file. Do not

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Understanding the /etc/sudoers file

The /etc/sudoers file is the configuration files for sudo. These is the file where the users and groups with root priviledges are stored. Do not edit the /etc/sudoers by hand, use sudo visudo instead. visudo opens the /etc/sudoers file in

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How to give root access to a normal user for a few commands only

Sometimes you need to allow a normal user to use a few root commands or exec scripts with root priviledges. In Linux, to give limited root access to a user, you need to edit the /etc/sudoers file. Do not edit

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How to give passwordless root priviledges to a normal user

To give root priviledges to a normal user, you need to edit the /etc/sudoers file. Do not edit the /etc/sudoers file by hand, because you may damage it. Use visudo. visudo opens the /etc/sudoers file in the default text editor.

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How to give a normal user shutdown and reboot access on a Linux station

Sometimes you may need to allow a normal user to shutdown or reboot the system. You can do that easily, by adding a line in /etc/sudoers. The allowed user will get root priviledges only for the shutdown and reboot commands.

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